How to store watches at home ?

July 08, 2021

How to store watches at home ?

Properly storing your watches can really help extend the life of your collection, whether you own just a few watches or are an avid collector. It only takes a little carelessness to permanently damage valuable watches. We'll show you how best to care for your watches to protect them from the elements and theft.

SO WHAT OPTIONS DO YOU HAVE FOR STORING YOUR WATCHES ?

Watch boxes / cases

If you like to display your watches and keep them in your room, a simple storage box is probably the best option. It looks like a regular jewellery box, but it's designed specifically for watches. Make sure you choose a well-padded and lined case - you can get cases with a soft lining, such as felt, and this soft material will prevent your watches from getting scratched. If you want to see your selection of watches without taking any of them off, watch boxes are a good idea as they usually have a clear glass lid.

Inserts and trays

This is a great way to store watches in a drawer. The specially designed insert or tray fits easily into a drawer. In many cases, these trays have a number of different compartments that allow the user to place boxes of watches as well as a section for bracelets and straps - and lay them flat on the surface.

Watch pockets

If you only have one watch or prefer to store your watches individually, watch cases are a great option. A single pouch really doesn't cost you much, which is a great idea if you're just starting your collection. They are very lightweight, so they can easily be moved and stored wherever you want, be it on the draw, in your safe or when you are in transit. Very often made from high quality leather, the case provides good protection for the watch.

Roll watch case

If you travel a lot and love watches, a watch roll is always a good investment. There are many different designs and you can choose one for several watches or, if you prefer, you can get a roll that only holds one watch. They are usually made of leather or a similar fabric. They are soft and flexible and therefore ideal for protecting watches when you are out and about.

Watch winder

When you are not wearing your automatic watch, the ideal solution is to put it in a watch winder. Of course, we know that automatic watches don't need to be wound by hand because they get their energy "automatically" from the wearer's body movement. A watch winder mimics this type of natural movement and ensures that any watch stored in it is ready to go when you want to wear it.

Using a watch holder for safe

A safe is probably the safest place to store your watches. If you go this route, it's important that you choose the one that best suits your collection. Of course, you can get a safe in any size and shape you want. So it's just a matter of whether you choose the safe specifically for your watch collection, or whether you prefer something that aesthetically matches the décor of your property. Either way, we think this is the best place to store your watch collection. Not only will it be protected from accidental damage in the house, but it will also be safe from thieves.
If none of the above options work for you, there are other solutions, including, believe it or not, a cigar humidor. Just as a humidor keeps cigars dry, it will do the same for your watches, protecting them from humidity and temperature extremes.
So we've looked at what you can store your watch in or on. Now let's take a look at how to properly store your watch, regardless of which storage option you choose.

HOW TO KEEP YOUR WATCHES SAFE

Face up

It is best to always store your watches face down. Regardless of how much soft material is around the watch, there is a real risk of damage if you place it face down. This "face up" applies whether you store it flat or wrapped around a watch stand. If it is necessary to place the watch on the crown to avoid damaging the glass, case or bezel, always choose this option as a crown is much easier and cheaper to replace than some other parts.

Leave space

If you keep several watches in one case, make sure there is space between each piece. The space doesn't have to be large, just about half a centimetre, which ensures that no watch is touching and possible scratches from friction should be prevented. If your budget allows, you can buy a special tray (as mentioned above) that has dividers - this keeps the watches separate.

Avoid magnetic fields

Most modern watches can be demagnetised without too much trouble, but why bother? Keep your watches away from computers etc and there should be no problems.

Use soft bags

It is a good idea to pack each of your watches in a cloth bag. They are not particularly expensive, although you will need several to protect each watch individually. The fabric gently protects the watch and absorbs any moisture. Alternatively, plastic bags can be used, but make sure you put a silica gel packet in each bag to combat the moisture mentioned above.

Removing the batteries

If any of your clocks are quartz, you need to be careful with the batteries. Batteries eventually and inevitably leak, and the corrosion that can result from leaking battery acid can cause damage to a watch's connections. If you are storing a clock for a long time, it is advisable to remove the battery beforehand. Carefully remove the back of the watch with a screwdriver, store the watch and keep the battery separate. Do not force the back of the watch off - it is best to take it to a jewellery shop and have it safely removed.

Protect your documents

Collecting watches can be an expensive hobby, so paperwork for each piece is important in case of a malfunction that would require a return or resale somewhere in the future. Like most things, a valuable second-hand watch is likely to be worth much more if it comes with its original packaging. So keep everything safe, store it separately from the watches themselves, but always know where it is.

To wear or not to wear ?

Unless you own an extremely rare and valuable watch, it's best to take them out of storage from time to time - there's really no hard and fast rule for this, but taking each watch out, winding it and wearing it from time to time will, if you'll excuse the pun, get everything "going". A potential buyer of one of your watches will want to know that everything is in good condition.